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BiblioBlast, October 2016: Home

The D. Samuel Gottesman Library's Monthly Newsletter

Welcome!

Welcome to BiblioBlast, the newsletter of the D. Samuel Gottesman Library of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. BiblioBlast will inform you about new Library resources and keep you up to date with our classes, events and other activities. It will also highlight tips to make our online resources easier and faster to use. 

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In this issue:

How Will You Celebrate National Medical Library Month?
New Infectious Disease Resource
Clinical Key Generating Security Warnings with EZProxy
Librarians Flip for Students
BioDigital Human Visualization Platform
Journal Editors Exhibit Now on Display
Resources on Research Data Management
Who knew? Excel Can Cause Inadvertent Gene Name Conversion Errors
Einstein Book Club
New E-Books
New from Clinical Key

Upcoming Library Events

Workshops are held in the Library Training Room, Forchheimer 119N. Click on a title to sign up.

Contact the Reference Department for more information, or to schedule an individual or small-group session.

Who knew? Excel Can Cause Inadvertent Gene Name Conversion Errors

Excel converts some gene names to dates. Research published in a recent issue of Genome Biology states: “A programmatic scan of leading genomics journals reveals that approximately one-fifth of papers with supplementary Excel gene lists contain erroneous gene name conversions.” Currently there is no way to deactivate the automatic conversion feature in Excel. Researchers, reviewers, editorial staff and database curators must remain vigilant

How Will You Celebrate National Medical Library Month?

Highlights include:

  • Get your own library-branded retractable ID holders and other giveaways.
  • Weekly Raffles: Answer a trivia question and be entered to win an Amazon or Starbucks gift card! Get more information from the Reference staff at the library.
  • Amnesty Week: Overdue books or journals? Return them on Monday-Friday, October 24–28, and you won’t have to pay the fine! Does not apply to Reserve items, Laptops, iPads or fines accrued for items previously returned.
  • Trick or Treat at the Library: Stop by the Circulation Desk in costume on Monday, October 31!  Grab a treat and get your picture taken.

New Infectious Disease Resource

The library has a trial to the web version of Sanford Guide to Antimicrobial Therapy.

Created by Jay P. Sanford, MD in 1969, the Sanford Guide was the outgrowth of a medical grand rounds handout on newer antibacterial agents. While the Sanford Guide's content, ubiquity, and delivery platforms have expanded over time, it continues to be edited by a team of leaders in the field and remains the most trusted name in the treatment of infectious diseases.

The trial will continue through November 2016.

Please send your comments to Racheline Habousha, Library Director.

Clinical Key Generating Security Warnings with EZProxy

The Library is experiencing problems with the Clinical Key database and EZProxy. When logging in, you will see an “insecure connection” warning message.

If you are on campus, just start a new session and go directly to http://www.clinicalkey.com.

If you are off campus and attempting to access the database via remote access you will see the untrusted connection warning. It is safe to go ahead and click through to the database.

The publisher and EZProxy are both aware of the problem, and we are doing all we can to get this issue resolved as quickly as possible. We apologize for the inconvenience.

Librarians Flip for Students

On September 14 and 15, as part of the curriculum, reference librarians taught 1st year students how to develop fundamental searching skills and 2nd year students how to search for evidence-based literature.

Coming at the beginning of the first and second years, both sessions were conducted in a flipped classroom format with two parts to each session. In addition, the session for the 2nd year students was part one of the two-part EPHEM2 course and was taught in conjunction with faculty for that course.

For the self-directed learning component, librarians developed an interactive, multi-media, web-based tutorial for students to complete prior to the classroom session. In the tutorial, the students were presented with a clinical case (via text and audio) and learned how to formulate a clinical question, search the biomedical literature using PubMed, find relevant articles to answer the question, and evaluate the results. Students had hands-on practice through embedded quizzes that reinforced important points. Based on the quiz results, librarians were able to focus on the concepts the students needed most help with during the classroom session embedded in the curriculum. 

During the classroom sessions, the students received two more cases and worked in groups of six to demonstrate their new searching knowledge and skills. At the same time, they received feedback from their peers and facilitators.

Resources on Research Data Management

Research data are:

  • Digital objects: such as text files, image files, sound files
  • Databases: structured collections of records or data stored in a computer system

The Office of Research Integrity defines research data as:

Any information or observations that are associated with a particular project, including experimental specimens, technologies, and products related to the inquiry.

How are you keeping track of your project data? Is it in a format that other researchers can use? Do you have a plan for how to manage your data?

Check out our guide on Research Data Management. It walks you through creating data management plans, metadata, as well as citing and storing your data. Additional questions? Email us.

Journal Editors Exhibit Now on Display

Stop by the lobby outside the library to see the annual exhibit honoring Einstein faculty who hold editorial positions on journals, serials and websites. This year’s exhibit includes 55 faculty members and 101 journals, serials or websites.

BioDigital Human Visualization Platform

The BioDigital Human has been described as “Google Earth meets the human body” (ABC News). It’s a cloud-based, virtual map of the human body that uses interactive 3D models to better explain medical conditions and concepts. For individuals, there is a free web-based version and a free app available for iPad, iPhone and Android. Give it a try and let us know what you think. Please email comments to Racheline Habousha, Library Director.

Einstein Book Club

Join the Book Club on November 9, when we will meet at Noon to celebrate our seventh anniversary and discuss The Poisoner's Handbook: Murder and the Birth of Forensic Medicine in Jazz Age New York, by Deborah Blum, “caviar for true crime fans and science buffs alike” (Kirkus Reviews).

The Book Club’s theme for next year will be global health. Come to the November meeting to help us choose our six books for next year.