Skip to main content

BiblioBlast, December 2017: Home

The D. Samuel Gottesman Library's Newsletter

Welcome!

Welcome to BiblioBlast, the newsletter of the D. Samuel Gottesman Library of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. BiblioBlast will inform you about new Library resources and keep you up to date with our classes, events and other activities. It will also highlight tips to make our online resources easier and faster to use. 

Subscribe to BiblioBlast and manage your subscription.

In this issue:

Medicine and Why Net Neutrality Matters

Resources To Avoid Predatory Publishers

PubsHub for Help in Deciding Where To Publish

NICHSR ONESearch for Health Policy Info

NIH Launches Crowdsourcing Project To Better Understand Pregnancy

Free Images and Radiology Database

New E-Books

E-Books from Clinical Key

E-Books from Wiley

Upcoming Library Events

Workshops are held in the Library Training Room, Forchheimer 119N. Click on a title to sign up.

Contact the Reference Department for more information, or to schedule an individual or small-group session.

Free Images and Radiology Database

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) hosts MedPix, a “searchable online database of medical images, teaching cases, and clinical topics.” This collection includes almost 54,000 images, including x-rays, photographs, and more, which you can search by patient symptoms and signs, diagnosis, organ system, image modality or description, keywords and more. You can also browse by diagnosis. MedPix was designed as a resource for current medical practitioners as well as medical students. MedPix also offers a free Continuing Medical Education (CME) course for current medical practitioners.

Medicine and Why Net Neutrality Matters

On December 14, the FCC is set to vote to repeal network neutrality protections adopted in 2015 and affirmed by a federal appeals court ruling in 2016. This could have far-reaching implications for healthcare, educational and nonprofit institutions. Read more about the importance of maintaining net neutrality protections on Einstein’s Doctor’s Tablet blog.

Resources To Avoid Predatory Publishers

The rise of open access publishing models has brought an increase in journals that profit from article submissions but do not follow proper publication practices. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Office of Extramural Research recently released a statement intended to "protect the credibility of published research" by encouraging authors to publish papers resulting from NIH-funded research in reputable journals. The statement includes links to resources for researchers, including:

Earlier this year, BMC Medicine published an article by Larissa Shamseer, David Moher et al, “Potential predatory and legitimate biomedical journals: can you tell the difference? A cross-sectional comparison,” (BMC Medicine 201715:28) that highlighted the following thirteen “salient characteristics of potential predatory journals” of which researchers should be aware:

  1. The scope of interest includes non-biomedical subjects alongside biomedical topics
  2. The website contains spelling and grammar errors
  3. Images are distorted/fuzzy, intended to look like something they are not, or which are unauthorized
  4. The homepage language targets authors
  5. The Index Copernicus Value is promoted on the website
  6. Description of the manuscript handling process is lacking
  7. Manuscripts are requested to be submitted via email
  8. Rapid publication is promised
  9. There is no retraction policy
  10. Information on whether and how journal content will be digitally preserved is absent
  11. The Article processing/publication charge is very low (e.g., < $150 USD)
  12. Journals claiming to be open access either retain copyright of published research or fail to mention copyright
  13. The contact email address is non-professional and non-journal affiliated (e.g., @gmail.com or @yahoo.com)

For help in deciding where to publish your article, read on to learn about PubsHub.

PubsHub for Help in Deciding Where To Publish

PubsHub, available through the Library website, is an online resource of information about journals, conferences and associations. You can look at journal titles by subject category and sort them by rejection rate, time to acceptance, impact factor or circulation. Look at an individual journal and find out much more information, such as the kinds of articles accepted and the length of time between acceptance of an article and its publication. Also search Congresses by subject category to find out meeting dates, due dates for abstracts and more.

Find PubsHub by clicking on More under Databases on the upper left of the library’s homepage. You’ll find it under Quick Reference Databases.

NICHSR ONESearch for Health Policy Info

ONESearch from the National Information Center on Health Services Research and Health Care Technology (NICHSR) is now one year old. If you have questions concerning health policy, health care costs, ongoing research, socioeconomic issues in health, disparities and inequalities. give NICHSR ONESearch a try. You can find projects, grey literature, datasets, indices, reliable websites, meetings, training, grant opportunities and more. For more information, watch an information video

NIH Launches Crowdsourcing Project To Better Understand Pregnancy

NIH has launched PregSource, a public-private partnership led by NIH’s Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD). PregSource aims to improve knowledge of pregnancy by collecting information directly from pregnant women. The project will explore physical and emotional aspects of pregnancy, labor and delivery and will identify challenges faced by specific subgroups of women. By offering a more comprehensive picture of the pregnancy experience — from normal pregnancies to those complicated by disease or other factors — PregSource hopes to inform strategies for improving maternal care in the U.S.

Women who sign up for PregSource use online surveys to share what they are experiencing, and they can compare these experiences to those of other participants. Over the course of their pregnancies, women can chart changes to their weight, sleep, mood, morning sickness and physical activity. In addition, they can access informational resources developed by experts on pregnancy, childbirth and child development. PregSource also enables women to track their experiences after childbirth to help determine if any outcomes, such as heart disease, can be linked to events during pregnancy.

PregSource is open to pregnant women ages 18 and older, and there is no cost to join. The project will not sell participants’ information, and participants will not receive ads or product announcements for pregnancy- or baby-related products or services. All personal information, such as names and addresses, will be removed from the collected data. The resulting “de-identified” data will then be shared with approved researchers for use in future studies.